Single Origin Coffee

Las Peñitas
$18 - 12oz

Notes of sweet mixed citrus. Think blood orange, navel, and ruby red. Dried mango and stonefruit. Vanilla and caramel.

Nicolas Alvarado’s farm, Las Peñitas, sits high at 1800 masl in the Los Andes region of Santa Bárbara. The farm is very small, only about 1.5 ha, but is one of the highest in the area. Santa Bárbara is considered to be part of the greater Montecillos region of Honduras. The mountain’s east facing slopes rise above Lake Yojoa, the country’s largest freshwater resource. Nicolas washes his cherry in cement tanks for about 24 hours before rinsing. The parchment is then dried in solar dryers for about 7-10 days.

Nicolas processes his coffee at Beneficio San Vicente, in the nearby town of Peña Blanca at the base of the mountain. Originally founded by the Paz family in the eighties, the mill has played a major role in the development of the area’s rise of specialty coffee production. Each season, San Vicente continues to promote specialty coffee and form new relationships with farmers looking to enter the specialty market. The benefício prioritizes transparency, and connects farmers to buyers who provide competitive prices for quality coffee. Growers are included in the entire transaction, and are always welcome to participate in cuppings and other quality analysis practices. The mill supports farmers throughout the year, and as of this past harvest season has hired a full time agronomist whose main focus is farm-level and processing assistance for growers.

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El Paraîso
$17 - 12oz

Notes of mango, pineapple, and spiced plum with toasted almond undertones.

Wil Armijo’s farm, El Paraíso, sits at about 1550 masl in the Los Andes subregion of the Santa Bárbara mountains. Santa Bárbara is considered to be part of the greater Montecillos region of Honduras. The mountain ’s east facing slopes rise above Lake Yojoa, the country’s largest freshwater resource. Wil washes his cherry in cement tanks for about 24 hours before rinsing. The parchment is then dried in solar dryers for about 7-10 days. Wil processes his coffee at Beneficio San Vicente, in the nearby town of Peña Blanca at the base of the mountain. Originally founded by the Paz family in the eighties, the mill has played a major role in the development of the area’s rise of specialty coffee production. Each season, San Vicente continues to promote the specialty market and form new relationships with farmers looking to enter specialty. The benefício prioritizes transparency, and connects farmers to buyers who provide competitive prices for quality coffee. Growers are included in the entire transaction, and are always welcome to participate in cuppings and other quality analysis practices. The mill supports farmers throughout the year, and as of this past harvest season has hired a full time agronomist whose main focus is farm-level and processing assistance for growers.

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Kavutiri
$19 - 12oz

Deep, juicy tones of cherry, blood orange, and grapefruit. Currant and butterscotch sweetness on the finish.

Sourced from the Kavutiri Factory near the Ena River in central Kenya. About 1,000 small scale farmers deliver cherry to the washing station for processing. The Kavutiri Factory itself was built in the mid 1960's after Kenya’s independence, as one of the earlier stations built in the region. It is centrally located and serves the surrounding regions of Embu, Kianjokomo, and Katuriri. The farmers deliver cherry to the station, where it is depulped and sent to fermentation tanks overnight. After the tanks, the coffee is soaked to remove any remaining sugar content. Water from the Ena River is used in the coffee washing process. The coffee is then sent to dry on raised beds for 7-15 days, depending on the weather.

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Zaragoza
$17 - 12oz

Notes of milk chocolate, dried fruit, and brown sugar. Velvety body with hints of berry and peach.

The community of Zaragoza lies just above the town of Putla, in the Sierra Mixteca mountain range of Oaxaca. Many of the farmers of Zaragoza are quality driven, and this year marks some early efforts in farmer level lot separation, in order to build higher tier bulk lots. One of the farmers in the community is connected through family to the Sierra Mixteca cooperative, based on the other side of the valley, in the town of Santa Maria Yucuhiti. Farmers cultivate older typica and bourbon varieties on small lots, which sit between 1400 - 1650 masl. They pick their own cherry, and use simple, small scale, and traditional processing methods. Ripe cherry is depulped using hand crank depulpers, undergoes dry fermentation for about a day, and is then sent to dry on patios under the sun.

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Pulcal
$17 - 12oz

Stone fruit forward profile. Notes of apricot, cherry, and mango complemented by rich tones of sweet fudge and a silky body.

Finca Carmona lies in Antigua, a region in southern Guatemala that is cradled by three volcanoes. Although ominous and powerful, the active volcanoes create mineral rich soil, and are prime areas for coffee. The powerhouse Zelaya family has been farming coffee for generations. One could say they are almost synonymous with Antigua coffee. Finca Carmona, one of many independent Zelaya operations, has been in the family since 1910, and is now owned and operated by María Zelaya.

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